UFOs in the Bible Interview for History Channel

The History Channel

In February of 2002, The History Channel flew Guy Malone to Los Angeles to interview him as part of a special entitled “UFOs in the Bible.” Producer Gabe Vandervort sent Malone a list of 10 questions he would like Guy to discuss.

While grateful for the opportunity at first, please note that the special which aired DID NOT IN FACT faithfully represent Malone’s answers, but instead merely spliced in certain things said to affirm the flawed premise of the show. They did this with others who have likewise gone on record saying the same was done to them…

That story and Guy Malone’s written rebuttal to this History Channel debacle, and the gross misquoting, is below. Mike Heiser’s response is here. For more accurate “UFOs & The Bible” videos, and Guy’s real views, see the Alien Resistance Videos Collection.

The below video is representative of a mass deception already being hoisted upon mankind… NOTE that this clip is posted here NOT as an endorsement of this view, but to show just how blatantly the lie contained within this viewpoint is being taught and believed by many people in the “mainstream,” not just UFO cults.

  

Below is Guy’s summation of these events, and response to their actions, which was picked up by two other news sources…

History Channel Special Distorts Christian Interviews to Promote “Alien Agenda”

Tuesday January 28, the History Channel premiered “UFOs in the Bible,” a program featuring several ufologists, authors and ministers. All apparently argued that most of the supernatural occurrences in the Bible represent the activity of alien spacecraft, citing Ezekiel’s wheel, Elijah’s ascension and Moses’ “fire by night” as primary examples. The program’s opening dialog even suggests that God himself is merely an advanced extra-terrestrial being, rather than supernatural deity. However, at least two of those appearing on the program have come forth to state publicly that the program deliberately misrepresented their views. Rather than airing their actual responses to the proposed ideas, both feel that they were wrongfully depicted as affirming these theories.

Dr. Hugh Ross, astronomer, and president of Reasons to Believe, says in a written statement that he has appeared on over 10 secular (non-Christian) documentaries, but “This is the first time that I was quoted completely out of context, in a way that conveyed the opposite of what I believe.” Guy Malone of Roswell New Mexico’s Alien Resistance, states that he “strongly objects” to the program’s out of context depiction of his views. “The two times I appear in the show, all that aired was me restating their questions as a sentence – at the producer’s instruction – but my answers (not shown) were actually rebuttals to their “UFOs in the Bible” theme.”

Malone adds that producer Gabe Vandervort e-mailed him a list of questions, which he typed out his answers to and rehearsed before the interview, then posted these answers on his website nearly a year ago. “Comparing my airtime to the History Channel Q&A on my site, you can see where they cut me off in mid-sentence, just as the “but” and “so…” were coming.”

While Dr. Ross did not likewise prepare a transcript, he states that Reasons to Believe staff member Robert Bontrager was present with him during the interview. Both affirm that during the 2-3 hour-long interview, Ross “…made it abundantly and repeatedly clear that I did not agree with the thesis of the televised documentary.” Nonetheless, his comments appear directly after the narrator implies that the biblical account of Sodom and Gomorra’s destruction was merely a myth “to reinforce the importance of piety” (from the narration). The show also postulates that perhaps the cities were destroyed by nuclear weapons from a UFO. As with Malone, Ross feels that he was wrongly depicted as agreeing with the show’s premises. He cites that his own book on UFOs and two other television documentaries which he has appeared on “… establish that my views on UFOs contradict what the History Channel broadcast promulgated.”

At least two other Christian experts in ufology were flown to Los Angeles and interviewed by Weller-Grossman Productions for the program, but were left completely out of the final version aired by the network. Ph.D. candidate Michael Heiser holds an Ivy League master’s degree in Ancient History, and one from another university in the Hebrew Bible, as well as maintaining “a life-long interest in UFOs and the paranormal.” Heiser says “I called my contact at WGS, and told them up front (based on a perceived slant in the questions) that if they interviewed me, they would not get the answers they evidently wanted. I was told this was no problem, since they wanted to give all sides to the issue.” The final product however, included no opposing or alternate (orthodox) material, despite the combined hours of tape left on the cutting room floor. Thus Heiser has now added a series of spirited challenges to his website. He asks the History Channel to “… demonstrate where the show “UFOs in the Bible” actually represents real history and sound historical methodology” and asks Weller-Grossman “to actually produce a show on these same topics with credentialed biblical scholars being substantially featured.” His editorial charges that the program displays “wholesale, gutless censorship” and asks the producers “Why is it that, in a show about UFOs and the BIBLE the only person interviewed with recognized graduate credentials in the Hebrew Bible and all the related ancient languages was excluded from the show?”

Heiser continues that he “can demonstrate from these texts, using sound scholarly methods and resources, that the ancient astronaut idea is an intellectual dogpile.” He also proposes a televised public debate between himself and any other ufologist “who rapes the Biblical texts,” which he will attend “any time, any place.”

Chuck Missler was also interviewed by Weller-Grossman, but despite his best-selling book and video series on UFOs and the Bible, was apparently also deemed unfit for the televised version of History Channel’s “UFOs in the Bible.” He did however, appear briefly on another W-G / HC production the same week – “UFO Hot Spots” – in which he appeared only long enough to affirm that show’s premise by stating “there’s something going on there that’s beyond our understanding” (referring to the construction of the Pyramids of Giza). He was not however, given any airtime regarding his published opinions on UFOs and their possible Biblical origins. Neither was his organization (Koinonia House) – nor Guy Malone’s (Alien Resistance) – listed along with his name on his television appearance. This despite the inclusion of other guest’s affiliations, such as the “Center for Inquiry” and “Enlightened Contact with Extra-Terrestrial Intelligence.” Malone suspects that this was to prevent interested viewers from being able to easily find his or Missler’s websites, only to find out that their work actually rebuts the statements made by the program – or especially the true answers Malone posted to the specific questions asked of him.

“The show’s other guests, Patrick Cooke, Chris Montgomery and Presbyterian minister Barry Downing (who were awarded the monopoly of airtime) were listed as “authors,” Malone says. “But the rest of us (Ross, Heiser, Missler and himself) all have books on this topic as well, which went unmentioned on the UFOs in the Bible show. Apparently someone’s pet doctrine prevailed, and they did not want to give the public the opportunity to find out that the show’s big ideas were really old hat to most of us. We can refute this stuff in our sleep – which is exactly what we did in our interviews.” The overall effect of the program’s “obviously biased, and obviously heretical presentation” Malone says, is that “far too many viewers are now considering the idea that God is really just an advanced ET. They were not given alternative explanations by this mockumentary, or allowed to hear what those equipped to refute the program’s seriously flawed premises actually had to say.”

Malone is currently gathering other comments from the show’s “edited” guests, and considering organizing a formal joint protest to the network. “We all thought we were being flown in and interviewed to at least round-out the show’s statements, like most balanced documentaries do. Apparently, we were taken to the cleaners. They used my and Ross’ clips out of context, splicing them in to affirm the show’s views, but not representing our own by any means – and leaving the other guys out entirely, who I guess just didn’t give them anything they could easily misrepresent. I feel vindicated at least, because I know what I said and even posted my answers online long before the show aired. But I am saddened at the number of people who are going to accept the show without question, since the History Channel is an assumed authority. This will likely keep many “seeking” people from saving faith, or any hope of ever understanding the Bible correctly.

“While the damage is mostly done, the unbalanced, shoddy journalism does need to be addressed. The show has already re-run once, and the History Channel needs to decide whether its ethical or even wise of them to continue to run it, given the statements by those of us interviewed. It makes people in the know think the network has been bought out by the Raelians. They also need to decide whether to continue to work with a production company that would produce something so slanted, and whether they’re going to remain silent, or make a public apology for such a bad slip-up. The integrity of their network really is at stake here.”

In an attempt to set the record straight, Malone and Heiser are formalizing their summer plans to hold a conference in Roswell New Mexico, where Christian speakers will air their views on UFO related topics. Given the situation, Dr. Ross has been invited to add on to the six speakers currently planned, and, Malone adds, “…the History Channel is welcome to tape it.”

-Guy Malone, Feb. 03, 2003



Interview Questions sent by Producer Gabe Vandervort to Guy Malone 
for the History Channel’s “UFOs in the Bible” Program

  1. Visual documentation can be found in Renaissance artwork, prehistoric cave art and pre-Columbian cultures depicting saucer-shaped flying objects. What might these have been? What might the correlation be between these and Biblical accounts of mysterious objects in the sky?
  2. What could have been the inspiration of the ancient artists of Nazca, Peru?
  3. What might have the Mayans been referring to when they described their gods coming from the sky to teach them complex mathematical and astronomical principles?
  4. What do you think is behind the belief systems of different UFO cults and their faithful reliance on salvation brought about by extraterrestrials (Heaven’s Gate) See here
  5. In the Bible, angels are mentioned hundreds of times, often exhibiting super-human characteristics like the ability to walk through walls, read minds and communicate telepathically. How do these accounts compare with the mysterious beings of other cultures? What might be the explanation? How do angels compare to aliens?  See here
  6. What might ancient Judeans have claimed to see chariots of fire in the sky? (What is the significance of chariots?) How do these compare to modern-day UFO accounts in the Holy Land?
  7. What could have caused the destruction of places like Sodom and Gomorrah, by ‘fire and brimstone from the sky’? Have there been other UFO sightings in these areas?
  8. Is it possible that early people had complex technological advancements whose secrets were lost in time?
  9. There is a highly detailed account in the book of Ezekiel which describes a massive vehicle coming down to earth and mysterious beings visiting him. What might this have been? Why might this story have been so believable?
  10. . What might the ancients have actually been experiencing when they documented Jesus Christ’s ascension into the ‘heavens’? Were there any unusual circumstances or witnesses present during this? How is his vehicle of ascension described (a cloud)?



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